Big Day of Giving

By Vasey Coman, Sacramento Region Community Foundation (SRCF)  |  2019-05-29

Handful of Big Day of Giving 2019 nonprofits. Photo courtesy of SRCF

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - During this past Big Day of Giving, nonprofits in the Sacramento region raised nearly $8.4 million from over 23,000 donors who gave 44,000 donations, exceeding the $7.4 million raised last year and bringing the total generated since the inception of this annual giving day to nearly $40 million.

“Yesterday, our community came together to celebrate the nonprofits that strengthen our region and build a better Sacramento area for everyone who lives here,” said Linda Beech Cutler, chief executive of the Sacramento Region Community Foundation, which has organized the day-long giving challenge since its beginning in 2013, when research demonstrated local philanthropy lagged national averages.

“When we launched Big Day of Giving, we aimed to grow giving in the capital area by making philanthropy something everyone in our community feels they can do. All these years later, it is incredibly heartening to see a philanthropic spirit thriving,” said Cutler.

“This community-wide movement is successful when the people who live here make a difference by chipping in to give back—during Big Day of Giving and every other day of the year, too,” she said, noting that the majority of the donations made through the Big Day of Giving website were under $50.

In all, nonprofits in the capital area generated $8,357,897* on May 2, and each of the 601 participating nonprofits received donations.

The organizations that topped the leaderboard represent a breadth of nonprofit sectors—the arts, human services, youth development, the environment, and animal services:

The amount each participating nonprofit raised is available to view on the website.

Along with helping nonprofits raise much-needed funds, the Foundation offers a robust training program to help build the capacity of participating nonprofits in areas such as donor engagement, board development, collaboration, marketing outreach, and storytelling prior to Big Day of Giving.

“Big Day of Giving has been essential to our work,” said Nicholas Haystings, Executive Director of Square Root Academy, which raised $8,335 on May 2 to fund the free STEM education it offers in underserved Sacramento neighborhoods. “We are a relatively new organization, so the Big Day of Giving networking and skill-building trainings have been essential to helping our small staff engage new supporters and grow interest in our programs—which means we can focus more on growing our impact.”

Gifts made during Big Day of Giving 2019 will fund diverse services throughout the region. Along with Square Root Academy’s classes, Big Day of Giving donations will make possible Runnin’ For Rhett’s purchase of 682 pairs of running shoes to educate area youth about the value of living a healthy lifestyle. Donations will also fund 14 weeks of Food Literacy Center’s classes at a local school, and ensure thousands of high school baseball players can access Keep Playing Baseball’s resources to succeed as collegiate student-athletes.

Nonprofit organizations held more than 100 events throughout the region to promote their missions and generate donations on Big Day of Giving, many of which were the result of collaborations between multiple participating organizations and local businesses. Creating alliances like these among nonprofits is a key goal of the Foundation’s initiative to strengthen the nonprofit sector, Expanding Philanthropy and the Social Economy.

In addition to Big Day of Giving donations raised off of the website and during events—which organizations had to add to their totals—many participating nonprofits raised pools of match funds to motivate day-of gifts; this year, organizations raised almost $1.5 million in matching funds.

Donors who gave through Donor Advised Funds at the Foundation and its partner, Yolo Community Foundation, made a significant impact during this year's giving day, too. In all, gifts from Foundation fundholders totaled $758,290 of the final tally.

Big Day of Giving was made possible with lead sponsorship by Western Health Advantage, in addition to the generosity of its other community partners.

To learn more about Big Day of Giving, please visitwww.bigdayofgiving.org, and follow it on Facebook andTwitter.

Nonprofits and their supporters in the Sacramento region should mark their calendars for next year’s Big Day of Giving on Thursday, May 7, 2020.

Big Day of Giving is powered by the region's online nonprofit portal, GivingEdge, and both are brought to the capital area by the Sacramento Region Community Foundation as part of its initiative to grow local philanthropy. Learn more on the Foundation's website, and sign up for its e-newsletter to stay abreast of the latest in local philanthropy.

Big Day of Giving 2019 is sponsored by Western Health Advantage, and was made possible with the support of many community partners. Find a complete list on the Big Day of Giving website.

Sacramento Region Community Foundation has been the trusted steward of charitable assets, a community catalyst for meaningful change and the advocate for shaping vital impact through philanthropy since 1983. As the center of philanthropy in the Sacramento Region, the Foundation's mission is to transform our community through focused leadership and advocacy that inspire partnerships and expand giving. Learn more at www.sacregcf.org.

 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CA (MPG) - Old couches. Left-over lumber. One-legged chairs. Used laptops and TVs. Broken refrigerators. Beat-up mattresses. Does this sound like your backyard or garage? Did you know the Sacramento County Department of Waste Management and Recycling will come to your home and pick these items up from your curb at no charge?

One Bulky Waste Pick-Up per calendar year is included in your garbage rate. The no-charge pick- up is good for an 8’ x 4’ x 4’ pile, with a maximum material amount of 5 cubic yards – about the size of a pickup bed loaded to the top of the cab. Additional pickups are only $25!

Bulky Waste Pick-Up services are available by appointment only. To schedule your pick-up, call (916) 875-5555 or complete the Waste Management and Recycling form online.

Acceptable items include: Appliances, E-Waste (TVs and computer monitors), Universal Waste (household batteries, fluorescent light bulbs less than 4 feet, and cell phones), Furniture/Mattresses, Pipes, Lumber, Lawn/Tree/Shrub Trimmings.

Please use your green waste container as much as possible for leaves, grass, weeds and prunings. The more you use your green waste cart, the more space in your Bulk Waste Pick-Up for items that cannot go into a cart.

Place these items to the side of your pile: Tires (no rims; maximum of 5); Junk.

Lumber, pipes and trimmings should be no more than four inches in diameter and five feet long.

Unacceptable items include: Commercial Waste, Dirt, Rocks, and Bricks, Glass Panes, Concrete, Vehicle Batteries, Household Garbage, Hot Ashes, Heavy Materials (like auto bodies, engines, etc.), Hazardous Waste. This includes paint, oil and chemicals. This material may be dropped off at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility located at the North Area Recovery Station. Call (916) 875-5555 for hours.

Customers are asked to place the materials in front of their property and on the same side of the street 24 hours before scheduled pick-up.

The County offers this service to help customers keep their neighborhoods and homes tidy. It also helps reduce illegal dumping.

Sometimes, people without access to trucks or trailers will illegally dump unwanted items along roadsides or in rural areas of the county. This causes blight and costs taxpayers tens of thousands of dollars every year to address.

Ted Horton, superintendent of operations for the Department of Waste Management and Recycling, says that each year the county removes about 23 million pounds of household junk through the Bulky Waste Pick-Up program.

Couches, beds and wood are the most commonly disposed of items. “But we’ll even take old hot tubs, as long as they are cut in half,” said Horton.

Appointment availability varies. Depending on demand there may be a wait of up to 3-4 weeks.

If you’d like to get rid of household junk or have questions about the program, please email sacgreenteam@saccounty.net or call Customer Service at 916-875-5555, Monday – Friday,

8:00 am – 4:30 pm.

...Read More!  
  |  

SMUD and CDFW Stock Thousands of Trout in Reservoirs

SMUD Press Release  |  2019-06-12

SMUD and CDFW will be stocking three separate reservoirs for recreational fishing.

EL DORADO COUNTY, CA (MPG) - SMUD and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) are again stocking three Sierra reservoirs with rainbow trout. The fish planting will run into August with SMUD stocking 25,000 pounds of fish into Union Valley, Ice House and Loon Lake reservoirs in El Dorado County. This is the fifth consecutive summer SMUD and CDFW have combined efforts to stock the reservoirs.

The trout plants are intended to enhance angling opportunities for the public. Surveys say fishing tops the reasons folks visit the Crystal Basin Recreation Area. On average, the stocked trout weigh one to two pounds each, including some trophy fish. SMUD, along with the owners of the Ice House Resort, have installed the “Crystal Basin Bragging Board” where anglers can post pictures of their catch from Crystal Basin reservoirs. There is also a scale available if anglers wish to weigh their catch and claim biggest-fish bragging rights. Anglers are also encouraged to tag SMUD on social media and show off their catch.

SMUD proactively works to improve the quality of life in El Dorado County, where many SMUD employees call home and work, and where the electric utility owns and operates the Upper American River Project (UARP), a system of hydroelectric generation facilities.

SMUD was awarded a new 50-year license by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in 2014 to continue operating the UARP, which provides nearly 700 megawatts of low-cost, clean, non-carbon-emitting hydro power, enough to provide about 15 to 20 percent of SMUD’s energy capacity during an average water year. The fish-stocking effort helps SMUD meet conditions of operating its FERC license for the UARP.

SMUD will coordinate six separate trout plantings starting in early June and continuing into early August. Union Valley, the largest of the three reservoirs, will get 9,600 pounds; Loon Lake, 7,750 pounds; and Ice House, 7,650. The fish provided by SMUD will come from Mount Lassen Trout Farms of Payne’s Creek. The company also stocks SMUD’s Rancho Seco Lake, which annually hosts the very popular Trout Derby.

Fishing licenses are available for purchase from more than 1,400 license agents throughout the state and can also be obtained online at wildlife.ca.gov/licensing.

For more information about UARP and associated projects, as well as current reservoir and stream release conditions, please visit smud.org and the Community and Recreational Areas Web pages.

 

...Read More!  
  |  

Optimists Hold High School Boys Volleyball All-Star Games

John Yoshikawa, Optimist Sports Director  |  2019-06-06

Volleyball players Matthew Yovzhiy and Jordan Tobey. Photo courtesy Optimist

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - The 22nd Annual Optimist High School Boys’ Volleyball All Star games were held on June 2, 2019 at Capital Christian High School, 9470 Micron Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95827.

The Small Schools North team won after playing four (4) sets; 25 – 21; 14 – 25; 25 – 19; and 25 – 17. The North Team Outstanding Player was Matthew Yovzhiy from Mira Loma High School. The South Team Outstanding Player was Jordan Tobey from Vacaville Christian High School.

The Large Schools North Team won the 2nd match after playing five (5) sets, 25 – 20; 20 – 25; 21 – 25; 25 – 21; and 15 – 11.The North Team Outstanding Player was Griffin Walters from El Camino High School. The South Outstanding Player was Miles Judd from Roseville High School.

The Small Schools North Team team was coached by Kay Tindelll from Mira Loma High School and Bill Evans from Wheatland High School. They were assisted by Marissa Tindell from Mira Loma High School. The Small Schools South Team was coached by Bryson Grant and Greg Grant from Capital Christian High School, and Carla Borges from Vacaville Christian High School. They were assisted by Alicia Borges from Vacaville Christian High School. The Large Schools North Team was coached by Winston Prather from Granite Bay High School, and assisted by Brian Jew from Woodcreek High School and Jamie Mathias from Del Oro High School. The Large Schools South Team was coached Dave Amituanai from Laguna Creek High School, and assisted by Theresa Dark from Oakmont High School, and Jill Smith from Elk Grove High School.

 

...Read More!  
  |  

Renaissance Singing Group Serenades Seniors

By Muffy Francke, Renaissance Society  |  2019-05-30

Singing for Fun’s ukulele ensemble: the Uk-u-Ladies. Photo courtesy of the Renaissance Society.

FAIR OAKS, CA (MPG) - On Tuesday, May 7, the Renaissance Society’s Singing for Fun chorus serenaded the residents of Oakmont of Fair Oaks retirement community. The residents were treated to songs that many not only remembered, but enjoyed as a sing-along with the encouragement of Chorus Director Sara Zeigler.

The singers performed such tunes as “When You’re Smiling”, “It’s a Wonderful World”, “Up a Lazy River”, “Jeepers Creepers”, and “We’ll Meet Again”. The Uk-u-Ladies, the group’s ukulele ensemble, provided toe tapping beats to tunes like “Ain’t She Sweet” and “Yes, Sir, That’s My Baby”. There were train whistles for “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” rhythmic maracas for “Lemon Tree,” and chorus member Maryann Frantz entertained with a rousing tap dance during “On the Sunny Side of the Street.” Narrator Bette Carr introduced each song with interesting and fun facts.

Singing for Fun is a class offered by the Renaissance Society, an organization in partnership with the California State University, Sacramento (CSUS), that provides opportunities for lifelong learning and community engagement for older adults. Society members choose to study topics proposed by peers who lead the seminars. There is a veritable smorgasbord of subjects which evolve from semester to semester depending on members’ interests.

Classes are held on the CSUS campus on Fridays and Saturdays during both Fall and Spring semesters. The Society also offers seminars, “birds of a feather” gatherings, book clubs and other activities such as Singing for Fun on other days and other locations.

The Society also hosts a Summer series of presentations where non-members are welcome. The schedule can be found at https://www.csus.edu/org/rensoc/calendar.html.

The Singing for Fun group chooses a new slate of songs each semester, rehearses for approximately eight weeks, and then performs for up to five different senior communities. This Spring in addition to the Oakmont show, they also entertained residents at Summerset Senior Living facility in Rancho Cordova, Sunrise of Fair Oaks, Aegis of Carmichael, and the Hart Senior Center in Sacramento.

The chorus has been part of the Renaissance experience for almost thirty years. Each semester, there are about forty participants, many of whom have been singing with the chorus for years. The only requirement besides Renaissance Society membership is to enjoy singing and sharing the joy with others. Director Zeigler emphasized that the group has “fun” in its name so there are no tryouts and no requirement to read music.

...Read More!  
  |  

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Saint Mary’s High School wins the first Sacramento Valley Lacrosse Conference Division II Championship with a 12 to 11 victory over Bella Vista High School in the championship game. Saint Mary’s finished the regular season with a 7-1 conference record and an overall record of 12-4. Division II consists of St Mary’s, Lincoln, Bella Vista, Casa Robles, Christian Bros and Rio Americano High Schools

As voted on by the Sacramento Valley Lacrosse coaches, Mike Mulvimill of Saint Mary’s High School was chosen as the Division II Coach of the Year. 

As voted on by the Sacramento Valley Lacrosse coaches, Derek Walaitis of Rio Americano High School was chosen as the Division II Player of the Year.

...Read More!  
  |  

Antiques Roadshow Returned to Sacramento

Story and photos by Trina L. Drotar  |  2019-05-29

Al and Virginia show off their treasures – a French doll that is actually German, a Jerry Crandall painting paid for legal services with a tiny pistol that Al said “allegedly a lawyer carried this with him.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Approximately 22,000 people sent emails in hopes that they would be selected to have their treasures appraised when Antiques Roadshow pulled into Sacramento and set up shop Monday, May 13th at Crocker Art Museum. Two thousand pairs of tickets were distributed to fans and casual viewers from the Sacramento area and far beyond. Each person was invited to bring two items for appraisal, along with the story behind each object.

This is the show’s second visit to Sacramento, and according to one lucky viewer and collector of treasures who won tickets both times, this visit was quite different. The first time, the event was held in the Convention Center nearly ten years ago and long lines were normal.

“This time, Antiques Roadshow was a well-oiled machine,” said Mattie, who has watched the show since its inception and followed its precursor, “The Collectors.”

“We didn’t have to search for parking because a parking lot was reserved for attendees and a shuttle bus took us to and from the Crocker.”

The show issued tickets with times spaced thirty minutes apart, which helped keep lines to a minimum, although some lines were definitely busier than others. The clock appraisers were hoping for people, while lines for Asian art, jewelry, and paintings were longer.

A triage appraisal area was set up in the Crocker’s dining area where preliminary appraisals determined which lines people needed to visit. A watch, it turns out, could end up in the collectibles line if it was a Mickey Mouse watch.

The show works regularly with 150 appraisers who volunteer their time, and KVIE’s marketing guru, Sarah, said that Sacramento’s event had about 70 appraisers on hand, including Brian Witherell, COO and Consignment Director of Witherell’s Auction House located in Sacramento.

The event also enlisted the help of 125 volunteers who performed an array of duties from greeting people to guiding them to their appropriate destinations. Some appraisers were in the courtyard and others were on the second floor in the Crocker ballroom and adjacent gallery rooms.

As fans of the show know, there is always a story behind the object and of the expected 4,000 attendees, 150 segments would be taped based on suggestions from the appraisers. Of those segments, the show hopes to pull together three one-hour episodes to air in 2020.

One of those stories was discovered near the feedback booth, something that was not available when the show visited in 2010. Al and Virginia brought in a doll that she believed to be French. It was German and the clothes were not original. She still loves the doll. Al discovered that his pistols are something that he needs to further pursue by contacting Smith and Wesson as suggested by his appraiser.

This couple did not win the lottery pull for tickets, but they were offered a second chance through a program called “Knock Our Socks Off.”

The painting Al carried was given to him by the artist, Jerry Crandall. Al explained that the painting was payment for his legal work for Crandall’s divorce.

“Allegedly a lawyer carried this with him,” he said about the tiny circa 1855 pistol pointed toward the painting.

Look for Al and Virginia when the credits run next year during one of the Sacramento episodes.

Sacramento police officers secured the street in front of the museum and manned a table in order to examine firearms which include pistols and rifles older than 1899 for the California visit.

Several attendees came in costumes ranging from top hats to Victorian Era dress.

Show fans might have recognized Leila Dunbar, the baseball expert, and Nicholas Lowry, the poster and print expert who looked dapper in his brown plaid suit and waxed mustache.

The consensus from attendees was that the event was fun, well organized, and everyone had a smile.

For additional information, visit: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/.

...Read More!  
  |  

Volunteers Pack 75,000 Meals to Feed the Hungry

Story and photos by Shaunna Boyd  |  2019-05-22

Rotary members stack boxes of packaged meals onto a shipping pallet for distribution to developing countries. Photo by Shaunna Boyd

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Rotary District 5180 has 41 clubs in the Sacramento Region that collaborated on a district-wide meal-packaging event on May 17 at Rusch Park Community Center in Citrus Heights. More than 250 volunteers worked in shifts to bag over 75,000 meals, which will be distributed by Rise Against Hunger, a non-profit international hunger relief organization.

Music blasted through the gymnasium as hundreds of volunteers enthusiastically worked their stations, filling buckets with ingredients, bagging, sealing, packing the finished meals into boxes, and stacking boxes onto shipping pallets. Youth exchange students from Rotary International, players from the Casa Robles High School football team, members of local churches, and rotary members from throughout the District all worked together to package meals for those in need.

The meal bags include a nutrient package, a scoop of dehydrated vegetables, soy protein, and rice. One meal package boiled in a gallon and half of water will feed six people. Rich Hale, president of the Citrus Heights Rotary Club, said the meals are sent to developing countries: “They go all over the world, wherever the need is.”

“There’s a lot of starving people in the world, and you cannot function in society if you’re hungry. That’s why this is so important,” said Hale. “One bag can feed a family of six, so you can see the impact. That’s why we do it.”

District 5180 held a Poker Night fundraiser in April to raise $20,000 for the meal-packing event, and Heinz donated an additional $3,000. With a total of $23,000, the District was able to set the goal of more 75,000 meals.

Hale said, “We’ve been wanting to have a big District event, so this was very successful.… Hopefully this gives us momentum for years to come and we can do this again.” Hale said that next year they’d like to fill a shipping container, which holds 289,000 meals.

Hale said Rise Against Hunger is “a very well-organized company.… They bring all the materials and all the equipment we need.”

“This is an amazing undertaking,” said Pete Schroeder of the Fair Oaks Rotary Club. “It’s just incredible when people get together and it’s organized and they know what they’re doing.”

Jim Quinney, Rise Against Hunger community engagement manager for the Sacramento territory, said, “We started working with the Rotary in Citrus Heights four years ago for the 10,000-meal event, and it’s grown and now we’re collaborating with other clubs.… It’s just been wonderful to see the spirit of collaboration, and all these people are true advocates working to end hunger by 2030.”

Quinney described the Rise Against Hunger meal-packing events as “scalable turn-key operations.” They have the resources to organize events of any size, from large work parties to small team-building events.

Quinney said, “We want to engage as many people as possible. Every day we want people thinking about hunger and how they can help.”

“Helping others is a big part of who we are, and who the club is,” said Fair Oaks Rotary Club member Joe Arguelles. “It’s important to come and stand by your fellow man and help other people, help those who need help, so you can really feel like you’ve done something good for somebody.”

...Read More!  
  |  

Making a Difference

Story and photos by Shaunna Boyd  |  2019-05-22

Keynote speaker Phil Oates (bottom left), Stanford defensive linemen Jovan Swahn (left) and Michael Williams (right), and Playmakers founder Greg Roeszler (second from right) honored the players for their service.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - The Playmakers Organization is a local non-profit that coaches character through leadership and provides free programs to underprivileged and at-risk youth. Playmakers hosted their 10th annual fundraising dinner on Saturday, April 27 at Divine Savior Church in Orangevale.

The evening’s festivities included live and silent auctions to raise money for the organization. Proceeds from the event will fund Playmakers’ free six-week all-day Summer Character Academy. Playmakers founder Greg “Coach Roz” Roeszler said, “We seek out the kids whose families cannot afford any kind of summer enrichment, so it is extremely important we have funding for our trained coaches and volunteers.”

The Summer Character Academy will serve at least 100 kids, teaching them teamwork and improving their self-confidence.

Phil Oates, part-owner of the Sacramento Kings, was the keynote speaker of the event. Oates explained that the most important part of coaching is character development. He said, “Coaches sacrifice for their teams and always put the kids first.”

“Playmakers are making a difference for kids,” said Oates. “They are very fiscally responsible with the contributions they receive.… They’ll make you proud.”

The dinner was donated by Chicago Fire and was served by players from the Rio Americano and El Camino football teams. The teams are working together as part of a unique reconciliation effort after a brawl last season forced them to forfeit the final game.

The fundraiser’s title sponsor was Fitguard president Ryan Meier. Playmakers’ sponsor Harrison Phillips of the Buffalo Bills was honored at the event, and Stanford defensive linemen Michael Williams and Jovan Swahn attended as honored guests.

Thanks to many generous donations, Playmakers raised more than $30,000 to fund their Summer Character Academy. The largest donations came from the Country Club Optimists and the Azevedo Foundation.

Coach Roz thanked Playmakers civic group participants — Rotary, Optimists, and Lions — and all of the donors and volunteers for making it possible to help so many kids in the region. “Sometimes kids need extra attention. It’s about investing time,” said Coach Roz. “That’s what we do at Playmakers. That’s what we do as coaches. We never give up on the kids.”

...Read More!  
  |  

Walmart Opens First Stand-alone Transportation Office in Sacramento

By Kim Ericksen, Elevate Public Affairs  |  2019-05-22

L-R: Derek McCowan, James Hulbert, Richard Prescott, Uni Cerezo (GM of the Sacramento Office), Peggy Biro, Steve Harper and McClellan Park

SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Walmart is opening the retailer’s first-ever standalone transportation office in Sacramento in a bid to recruit up to 130 experienced truck drivers for its private fleet.

The office, which opened a temporary location on April 1, will service stores and distribution centers in northern California, southern Oregon, and east to Reno, Nevada. Drivers at this location will qualify for the company’s recently announced driver pay increase. Walmart drivers can earn an average of $87,500 in their first year of employment with an all-in rate of nearly 89 cents per mile.

Walmart has more than 65 transportation offices throughout the country, but Sacramento will be the first that is not co-located with a distribution center. The permanent location will be located in the McClellan Business Park and will have a drop yard. The office will have 85 trucks and 100 trailers.

“We’re excited to open a facility in Sacramento where there is a deep pool of talented, experienced truck drivers,” said Uni Cerezo, regional transportation manager of the Sacramento transportation office. “Walmart continues to explore how we can operate more efficiently and serve our customers’ changing needs, and this office will serve an important customer market for us.”

Walmart plans to accept internal Walmart transfers and recruit externally. To qualify to drive for Walmart, a driver must have 30 months of commercial driving experience in the last three years and a clean safety record for the past three years. For details and to apply, please see www.drive4walmart.com.

Those drivers hired to staff the Sacramento transportation office will differ from others in the industry in that they will start and end their weeks in the same location and have home time each week. Other perks and benefits of driving for Walmart extend well beyond the competitive per/mile rate and activity-based pay. Some of the reasons truck drivers say they enjoy working for Walmart include:

Great benefits. Walmart drivers have access to company benefits on the first day and can earn as much as 21 days of Paid Time Off (PTO) in their first year;

Predictable home time. Walmart operates on a weekly schedule, so drivers know when they will be home and on the road. We use a bidding process two to three times a year to set their schedules, so drivers know where they stand on work-life balance;

Walmart is one of the safest fleets operating with contemporary well-maintained equipment. At Walmart our drivers drive and earn money rather than waiting for a truck to be fixed. Walmart offers quarterly safety bonuses and a safety incentive and recognition programs. The American Transportation Association has awarded Walmart the Safest Fleet in the Over 250 Million Mile Division for the past 5 consecutive years;

Transportation offices all over the country. Walmart operates more than 70 transportation offices throughout the U.S.;

No-touch freight. Walmart truck drivers don’t unload trucks;

Safe parking. Walmart drivers park in well-lit, safe parking in Walmart stores, Sam’s Clubs and distribution centers across the country.


 

...Read More!  
  |